Rollright Stones Story

 

Standing near two ancient stones that are part of the Rollright Stone circle, I noticed a story. A story… not a speculation because the stones are now in a different condition compared to when they were put up by Bronze Age stone circle builders. The story is about shapeshifting. We see a shaman woman with a respectable headdress to the right having her face almost blended with an animal that looks directly at her, symbolizing contact, perhaps a conversation. The animal looks like a rabbit, or a pig, and itself is shapeshifting because its back side has another shape of an animal head.

Both the shaman woman and the animal emerge from the Underworld, which is known for to be a place to journey to in order to meet or consult your spirit animal. As the shaman woman is either sinking into trance, and thus into the Underworld, the shapeshifting takes place and the animal and shaman are coming face to face. Or, they emerge from the Underworld and as the shaman woman is coming out of her trance, the pig/rabbit leaves her, only their noses are still connected, and slowly takes its own form again, a form still somewhat dreamy and not easily to identify (pig or rabbit?).

Maybe stone circles were storytelling ‘books’ or instruction manuals used by shamans to educate a new generation of practitioners. Maybe the stones were not only chosen because of their shapes but painted as well to enhance the manual’s illustrations. Maybe…maybe.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

At Etsy

At Instagram

May I recommend my booklet that is currently 2 British ponds at Amazon.co.uk. This extremely low price is only granted to the first customer. As soon as one has bought it for 2 British ponds, the price goes up again. This price is lower that its production costs. I hope one of my regular website visitors is in need for a sweet gift.

 

 

 

Postage Stamp Design

 

 

Recently, I found out that one can buy online postage stamps. It is very handy but such ‘post stamp’ appears to be a sudoku-like 9 square code that you pen down in the upper right corner of an envelope. Handy but disappointing, especially when you enjoy receiving a neatly handwritten envelope with an exotic postage stamp.

 

As so much digitalization is met with a return to pre-computer behaviour, like note booking, calligraphy, and snail-mail, I decided to return to using post stamps too. I bought a bag of old, hobby postage stamps that are used by Hobonichi journalling or notebook designing, and added them next to the postage codes. Somehow that didn’t do the job. And so, I set out to design a post stamp that shows a lovely nature scene, elegance, and spaciousness.

 

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Paula’s booklet at Amazon

The Post Stamp at Etsy

Paula’s Etsy shop

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Commission Heraldry

It is such fun to work on this commission that shows a unicorn. How do unicorns look like? I did some research. Apparently unicorns have sheep-like faces and the tails of a wild boar, a lion, or a donkey. Their bodies sometimes look like sheep, dogs, horses, or deer. Baby unicorns look lovely. Their horns are often tall, sometimes short but most of the time twisted. Unicorns get killed frequently, sometimes snuggle up to Medieval ladies, or get used as horses or donkeys. They fight too, especially with lions. They often have horse or deer hooves sometimes lion paws. They are elegant or not; victim or aggressor. Thus drawing a unicorn feels like drawing a composite mammal; I even had to look up the spiral tusk of a narwhal, our sea-unicorns. The preferences were; snow-leopard print on the back, a beard and curly hair near its hooves.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

On Etsy.

Heraldry Commission

An Original Fibonacci Wave Mandarin Duck Drawing to Celebrate Love Wedding Friendship Engagement

Mandarin Ducks Bobbing on Hokusai’s Wave

STORY
Says the male outstanding colourful Mandarin drake to his lovely wife; ‘I love you profoundly; I will stay with you till the end of my days. I don’t know where I end and you begin’. Says the sweet female duck to her handsome drake; ‘Such is our lifelong bond; the high waves of life can’t drift us apart. Together we swim, spatter and stay close to each other to confirm our bond that will last a lifetime’.

OBSERVATION
Is there something more beautiful than seeing a closely bonded couple, in which the male and female are equal in rights, expression, and status. Their love doesn’t need dominance, it isn’t a power-game. They have moved beyond that, to a realm that we call love.

ARTIST STATEMENT
I have drawn, painted, and sold many Mandarin Duck couples and it brings me great pleasure that in parts of the world, where I do not live or travel, my mandarin duck drawings decorate walls of living, study or sleeping rooms. Mandarin Ducks symbolize love and loyalty, and friendship. This drawing has a luxurious, golden border. It needs a lovely square frame.

 

FENG SHUI
In Asia and in Feng Shui it is said that having Mandarin Ducks in your home (painting or picture) attracts love and loyalty. And why not? When people enter the room, they notice this picture of love and loyalty and that is subtly stored in their minds and hearts. They don’t see a drawing or print with one object, but with two birds that love each other. It sets the mindset or mood for a start of a deep friendship or love. Having a mandarin print in your home is suppose to attract love. Maybe it isn’t a myth at all. In traditional Asian culture, mandarin ducks are believed to be lifelong couples, unlike other species of ducks. Hence they are regarded as a symbol of love, affection and fidelity.

FIBONACCI SEQUENCE
I have drawn mandarin ducks in full colour and as albino and leucistic couples. I have drawn them against a minimalist white background, suggesting a pond, or suggesting reeds. And I was about to set out to add a new couple to my portfolio when I noticed the Fibonacci Sequence in one of my old sketches. It made my heart miss a beat because it brought a flood of inspiration. I immediately set out to make a circular composition, adding two ducks shaped as in the well-know Fibonacci fashion. And after having done that successfully, I couldn’t stop and added parts of The Great Wave off Kanagawa by the Japanese artist Hokusai next to the mandarin ducks. Now I had four Fibonacci elements, as I recognized the Fibonacci sequence in Hokusai’s wave too.

MANDARIN DUCKS
These mandarin duck couple, deeply in love with each other, are bathing in wild waters. In fact, they are so deeply bonded, they have no idea where they individually begin or end. They have become one in emotion and routine. They are one with the waters they live in too. The beautiful Hokusai wave, which could be interpreted as the pleasant and unpleasant high waves life throws at every couple, can’t separate them. They will stay together during their whole life; in high tide and low tide, in calm and difficult times, through day and night, till the end.

COPYRIGHT & ORDERING
This drawing/design is copyrighted. I offer this original drawing as a commission. This means that your drawing is hand-drawn, slightly different not in shape or style but perhaps a bit different in colour, as it will be a hand-drawn copy of the first drawing. Original drawings should be ordered via Etsy and will have a waiting list as I draw them mindfully.

YIN YANG SYMBOL
Please, notice the Mandarin ducks eyes holding a Yin-Yang symbol. I can do your drawing without this symbol hidden in their cute eyes.

At Etsy

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

@mindfuldrawing on Instagram

Inquiries:

For the sole purpose to inspire you…

For the sole purpose of inspiring you, I like to show you what dropped in my mail box from Japan; two lovely packages with beautiful Sashiko threads. I chose these colours for representing Earth and Ocean. The earth being dressed up in autumn colours and the ocean with different hues of blue and green.

You can travel the world by car or plane but you can also travel through the world of crafts. I wrote in a former blogpost that I can’t exactly remember how I ventured into the world of Sashiko. But by dwelling in the world of Sashiko, I noticed how beautiful some Japanese hand-dyed threads are. I come across a lot of thread that I can’t order because I can’t read Japanese. However, these threads I found at the Japanese Amazon and they will soon assist me in creating a Sashiko display that is both experimental and (hopefully) decorative. Before you think, ‘Paula has traded her pen and pencils for needles’. No. Certainly not. Please, return soon for more creative updates and inspiration.

Love from Paula

P.S. Being back in the Netherlands, I designed a new, bilingual name card. I also re-activated my Etsy shop. It needs some tweaks but it shows that I am back again after a long Irish sabbatical. Visitekaartjes.jpg

 

 

Tufted Duck Couples in Different Colours

My Tufted Duck series is growing steadily. One more to go for having six.

imagesEvery duck shows different stitches.

A few months ago, I bought The Embroidery Stitch Bible by Betty Barnden. Leafing through it propelled me back to Junior School, art-class. I could see myself, as a young girl, working on a Needle Sampler. I still remember it! It was a pretty one with many different stitches, numbers, puppets, and floral designs.

 

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It is fun to get acquainted with different stitches again. I also feel that textile crafting is good for the brain and a fun thing to do. It keeps my hands busy and my mind creative. It does demand concentration but in a pleasant way.

 

Textile crafting certainly has the same effect as meditation.

After finishing an embroidery hoop, there is some tidying up and reorganizing to do. And after that, I like to study which different embroidery arts exits. I am very smitten with Japanese and Chinese ‘silk’ embroidery but also I am impressed by Crewel designs. Most likely, I will end up creating eclectic pieces, being so widely inspired.

Be creative & be happy,

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Artist, Author & Expat

‘Birds, Butterflies, Fish & Botany.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer's Birds, Butterflies, Fish & Botany

Embroidery as Art

What makes embroidery art? What is required for embroidery to become a masterpiece? I have read a few books on embroidery but I haven’t come across a reflection on this question. As I am rather new to embroidery, I can only use my fine art (painting) knowledge.


A work of fine art is mostly appreciated for technical and artistic exquisite execution (skill and artistic talent). Having said this, there are many works of art that are regarderd masterpieces because of social, political or purely creative qualities.

For a beautiful piece of embroidery some criteria are similar to painting; technical skill, colour-choice, composition, originality of concept/theme, and quality of materials. Don’t underestimate originality; it is enjoyable and valued to see artisans using their your own source of inspiration. Their artwork reflects their life and their conflict or love for their life living in a certain place and time. Such inspiration creates a unique and uncompromising style or signature.

Blue Tufted Ducks by Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Returning to the question ‘What makes embroidery art?’ Embroidery demands an equal amount of skill as painting, drawing, woodwork, and ceramics. For all artwork counts that more skill leads to increased quality and value.

‘Blue Ducks’ & ‘Green Ducks’ in the series of Tufted Ducks by Paula Kuitenbrouwer.

I used gold thread & various blues plus freehand-stitch, pekinese-stitch, french-knots & openchain-stitch. I always use my own designs, based on my coloured pencil drawings or oil paintings. Occasionally I use my sketches for making lino-prints too.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Artist, Author & Expat

‘Birds, Butterflies, Fish & Botany’

@mindfuldrawing on Instagram

Personalized Birthday Print with Favourite Birds, Flowers or Butterflies

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I’ve designed a personalized birthday print for my father’s 85th birthday. It show his three favourite birds. There is a lapwing on the left, a collard dove in the middle, and an oyster-catcher at the right. Finding a harmonious combination of numbers and birds was a nice task to work out. The collared dove stands high and mighty on the 5, with his beak resembling the shape of the little flag of the 5. The curvy chest of the lapwing is  synchronized with the curve of the 8. And the chest of the oyster-catcher is aligned with the curve of the 5. The oyster-catcher and the lapwing hold the 8 and 5 in place by putting their legs on both sides of the numbers.

Paula