Mandarin & Wood Ducks Cards

 

Mandarin and Wood ducks nest in tree cavities. The female doesn’t feed her ducklings because that is too much work compared to having a nest on water level between reeds. There is another bird that doesn’t feed its young. Lapwings don’t feed their chicks but for other reasons. Lapwing chicks are born on a field that lies fallow, which means they are very vulnerable to predators. Parent lapwings use all their energy to guide and defend their chicks. Feeding would lead predators directly to the cute fluff balls.
There is another difference between lapwings and mandarin and wood ducks, apart from lapwings being meadow birds and the other two are waterfowl. Lapwings both take care for raising their young in a coordinated manner. When danger is detected one of the parents will call out orders (mainly ‘For the love of life, freeze and remain still!’) while the other parent will cleverly distract or lead the predator away from the chicks.
The male mandarin and wood duck, both being such handsome drakes, can’t do that, they wisely stay away from the mums and their ducklings. Should the extraordinary colourful daddy of the family take part in feeding the ducklings, he would draw too much attention to his reproduced and fluffy DNA. For a female mandarin duck to be married (yes, for life) to such handsome fellow comes with a price.
Paula Kuitenbrouwer
Artist & Author

instagram_PNG13.png @ mindfuldrawing

img_4951I have made a few Mandarin and Wood Duck cards, with a full colour inlay. They come in protective cellophane and a seal sticker. There are at my Etsy, but you can contact me too via the contact form. (scroll down).

 

Shapeshifting

I followed a history course on the Celts and enjoyed learning more about Celtic Art. What I highly appreciated about Celtic art is that one can find different themes in one display of art. Hidden faces, different animals, or stylized motifs, all are woven together in a complex piece of art.

For Christmas, Yule or Midwinter, I drew a stag and used his curvy antlers to add birds to the scene. Hopefully you will be able to count 34 of them.

There is nothing intrinsic Celtic about this drawing, except the idea of having animals as a theme, fusing  them, and thus showing a process of shape-shifting. Or perhaps alluding to perceiving more than one perspective?

What do you see? Antlers or birds? Are the eyes and ears of the stag eyes and ears or birds? Or both? If so, what does that tell us about our perception?

My art card comes as a printed photo on a recycle paper, with a matching envelope. Its inlay is a full colour print on creamy white. A sticker with my name and website decorates the back. The card comes with a sticker seal and a vintage post stamp, Christian, Pagan or Fine Classical Arts themed. In one of the photos you see a  lovely Glastonbury Thorn vintage post stamp.

For more go to my Etsy.

I have added 4 of these cards to my shop. They come in protective cellophane and make lovely gifts.

 

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

@ mindfuldrawing on Instagram