Jugenstil Art Nouveau Ex Libris (Work in Progress)

Designing Celtic interlace is fun; making an Art Nouveau (Jugendstil) corner design is as exciting.

Art Nouveau added beauty to our world between 1890 and 1910. Both Jugendstil and Celtic patterns were inspired by natural forms and structures, particularly the curved and intertwined lines of plants and flowers. What Celtic design has more than Jugendstil are Celtic animals like boars, horses, and birds. Jugendstil used more shell shapes. What I love about both is that one has to make an effort to understand the designs. Although they look instantly beautiful and fascinating, one can spend extra time to ‘unlock’ what can be seen in these natural patterns. Did I just see an owl? Or was it a horse-head? Flowers seem to come and go, an organic flow of natural forms that tell us a story. Perhaps a story of a woodland walk, or of a floral bouquet one gives to a friend. Or perhaps we are looking at a story of a beach walk, collecting shells. Life is like that and our dream-world is like that: we are witnessing a flow of events.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

At Etsy

at Bloglovin

Celtic Artist Card

 

Celtic Art Card by Paula Kuitenbrouwer
Celtic Inspired Art Card by Paula Kuitenbrouwer
Text on Card Paula Kuitenbrouwer
Text on Celtic Art Card by Paula Kuitenbrouwer

This is a handmade card showing the illusion of an antique golden-silver disk with Lapis Lazuli inlays. There are four boars, many swans, and 4 hidden faces to discover. Inside the card there is a full colour inlay and an extra inlay with the following text: My Celtic Art Project. This is my contribution to my ‘Who are the Celts?’ course at Oxford Department for Continuing Education, week 5 ‘Make your Own Celtic Art’ (2017). At the end of a demanding week of studying participants were challenged to make their own Celtic art. I used Golden/Silver ink-pens, an ordinary Bic blue pen, art paper, a protector, and many rulers to create an illusion of a golden plate decorated with silver and Lapis Lazuli boars. Notice the boars, hidden faces, and many swans.
© by Paula Kuitenbrouwer

This engaging card comes in protective cellophane, a name card, and a seal sticker. All in all this is an art project card that will entertain its (new) owner and it leaves plenty of room for a handwritten text.

At Etsy.

 

My Celtic Art Project

My Celtic Art Project 

This is my contribution to my “Who are the Celts’ course at Oxford Department for Continuing Education, week 5 ‘Celtic Art’ (2017). At the end of a demanding study week the participants were challenged to make their own Celtic art, a drawing, woodwork, or poem, whatever your prefer.
I managed to finish my Celtic Art project within a fortnight because it was a lot of drawing. Strangely enough, I was always in awe when I saw Celtic art but I was never challenged or commissioned to make Celtic art.  I had to remove my anxiety for too much rigid mathematical organization (the patterns and swirls) and focus on the hidden mythology, faces and animals. Although I love Celtic art, I have always feel resistance to make it as it seems to limit artistic expression to its theme as the patterns are strictly organized and repetitive. The article on the enchantment of technology inspired me too to embrace  a geometrical challenge for making Celtic patterns.  Anyway, I am not going to say: ‘I did it’, but I enjoyed the challenge!

Used: Golden/Silver ink-pens, an ordinary Bic blue pen, art paper, a protector and many rulers.

Note: preliminary sketches trying out mathematical organization, a large original drawing, a print & a small postcard. I printed the title of this artwork with a Celtic letter type:

Golden with Silver & Lapis Lazuli Celtic Plate
with Boar, Hidden Face & Swans
© by Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Enjoy!

Paula