Commission Heraldry

It is such fun to work on this commission that shows a unicorn. How do unicorns look like? I did some research. Apparently unicorns have sheep-like faces and the tails of a wild boar, a lion, or a donkey. Their bodies sometimes look like sheep, dogs, horses, or deer. Baby unicorns look lovely. Their horns are often tall, sometimes short but most of the time twisted. Unicorns get killed frequently, sometimes snuggle up to Medieval ladies, or get used as horses or donkeys. They fight too, especially with lions. They often have horse or deer hooves sometimes lion paws. They are elegant or not; victim or aggressor. Thus drawing a unicorn feels like drawing a composite mammal; I even had to look up the spiral tusk of a narwhal, our sea-unicorns. The preferences were; snow-leopard print on the back, a beard and curly hair near its hooves.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

On Etsy.

Heraldry Commission

Prehistoric Rhinoceros

Rhinoceros Embroidery
May I present some prehistoric testosterone? From Chauvet Cave (France), a most impressive Rhinoceros, who, after being drawn on beautiful coloured cave walls at c. 30,000 BCE, never fails to impress.

P.S. My booklet is down to 2.99 British Ponds on Amazon.co.uk. This is such a low price, and it is First Come, First Serve. After it is bought, the price goes up again. So, be quick.

And let me know when you have bought my booklet: I will send you an Ex Libris. State your request for the Raphael Apostle, the Raphael Horse or the Old Tree Ex Libris.

More news: all hand embroidered Duck Couples and my Woolly Rhinoceros are now listed on Etsy. You will be surprised how low I keep my prices. I have to do that because shipping is so expensive and I think art and crafts should be affordable.

All at Etsy.

For the sole purpose to inspire you…

For the sole purpose of inspiring you, I like to show you what dropped in my mail box from Japan; two lovely packages with beautiful Sashiko threads. I chose these colours for representing Earth and Ocean. The earth being dressed up in autumn colours and the ocean with different hues of blue and green.

You can travel the world by car or plane but you can also travel through the world of crafts. I wrote in a former blogpost that I can’t exactly remember how I ventured into the world of Sashiko. But by dwelling in the world of Sashiko, I noticed how beautiful some Japanese hand-dyed threads are. I come across a lot of thread that I can’t order because I can’t read Japanese. However, these threads I found at the Japanese Amazon and they will soon assist me in creating a Sashiko display that is both experimental and (hopefully) decorative. Before you think, ‘Paula has traded her pen and pencils for needles’. No. Certainly not. Please, return soon for more creative updates and inspiration.

Love from Paula

P.S. Being back in the Netherlands, I designed a new, bilingual name card. I also re-activated my Etsy shop. It needs some tweaks but it shows that I am back again after a long Irish sabbatical. Visitekaartjes.jpg

 

 

Lotus Plant Drawings: Botanical and Symbolic

I have drawn two different lotus plants. Much venerated in Buddhism, the lotus is one of the ‘Eight Auspicious Symbols’.

For my first drawing, ‘Lotus Plant’, I researched and focused on all the interconnecting parts of the plant. Most drawings and paintings of the lotus concentrate on the flower itself; the next part, the stem, is submerged and thus often merely hinted at. And the roots, although many of us will be familiar with them as edible parts of the plant, are rarely depicted in art, since they grow deep in the muddy bed of the pond.

For a Buddhist, this concept of living in three mediums – mud, water, air – signifies a progression. The soul journeys from the muddiness of materialism, through the water-world in which we live and experience our daily, day-to-day lives, and thence beyond, to enlightenment in the ethereal world of light and air. That these parts are all connected, roots to stem, stem to flower, is reflected in my drawing.

My ‘Lotus Pond with Tortoise’ shows the flowering plant, partly in water, and blooming just at the surface. A tortoise, resting on a rock, looks up at the lotus. Such a bright and beautiful flower is an inspiration to all who see it, tortoise as much as human.

In Asian culture, tortoises are sacred. The longevity and tenacity that they symbolize seemed to me to be a wonderful way to celebrate what the birthday of the Buddha means. We need to live long and work hard to reach enlightenment. And if the ageing process is enlightenment in slow motion, as John C. Robinson describes in his book ‘The Three Secrets of Ageing’, then my combining of the symbols of enlightenment with those of longevity expresses this process.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Available at Etsy.