Going beyond predictable performance practice

Decades back, I read a remark that most people dare not to accept their greatness. Today such quote would provoke criticism because currently there are too many inflated egos grabbing power and money. If it wasn’t for the middle class, the mediocracy, the sane and well balanced mass, and the majority of people who ‘Stay Calm & Carry On’ that we are still sailing through epic well-fare inequalities without revolt. So, bravo for this ‘middle’ group. However and despite of living through this inflated ego era, the quote recently inspired me to run an experiment as I applied in solely on art practice.

I know what I am good at in my studio. But what would happen if I would go beyond choosing the comfortable or predictable performance practice? What if I, after feeling inspired, would dismiss my first impulse to work, hit a pause button, and dwell a day or two on the question of how can I work with this idea on a next ‘greater’ level? And with the next level I mean higher quality of tools, larger in size, and/or more daring in execution (the latest prerequisite/demand being the most difficult to imagine). Well, it has been fruitful to run such experiment. It has resulted in opening my oil paint box that had been closed for over 2 years. The smell of the tubes and the well-known names of the classical palette…mmmm! And touching a large white canvas, already seeing with my mind’s eye a primarily lay-out (the size of the canvas scares me). The ‘next level’ might still not be something great, instead it probably is still very modest, but the process of lifting up yourself to a higher and more daring level has certainly given much joy and has nourished my creativity.

Paula

 

My booklet at Amazon.com & Amazon.co.uk and, of course, Etsy. I can not add a lovely art card to your order when you order at Amazon, however I will add on one should you order at Etsy.

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Tufted Duck Couples in Different Colours

My Tufted Duck series is growing steadily. One more to go for having six.

imagesEvery duck shows different stitches.

A few months ago, I bought The Embroidery Stitch Bible by Betty Barnden. Leafing through it propelled me back to Junior School, art-class. I could see myself, as a young girl, working on a Needle Sampler. I still remember it! It was a pretty one with many different stitches, numbers, puppets, and floral designs.

 

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It is fun to get acquainted with different stitches again. I also feel that textile crafting is good for the brain and a fun thing to do. It keeps my hands busy and my mind creative. It does demand concentration but in a pleasant way.

 

Textile crafting certainly has the same effect as meditation.

After finishing an embroidery hoop, there is some tidying up and reorganizing to do. And after that, I like to study which different embroidery arts exits. I am very smitten with Japanese and Chinese ‘silk’ embroidery but also I am impressed by Crewel designs. Most likely, I will end up creating eclectic pieces, being so widely inspired.

Be creative & be happy,

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Artist, Author & Expat

‘Birds, Butterflies, Fish & Botany.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer's Birds, Butterflies, Fish & Botany

Rachel Ruysch (1664-1750)

A flower bouquet by Rachel Ruysch. I have seen Ruysch’ paintings in different museums and studied how she, and other Golden Age flower painters, made these paintings.

Ruysch’ flower bouquets’ do not exist in real. Ruysch’ flower paintings show all flowers in bloom at the same time. We know that flowers bloom in different seasons. What you see in Ruysch’ paintings is that spring, summer, late summer, probably even beginning of the fall merged in one bouquet.

Golden Age floral painters made several sketches and paintings of flowers during the seasons. Sometimes artists waited whole seasons for a particular plant to flower so it could be drawn and later painted. They used their sketches often for more than one painting.

Rachel Ruysch had 10 children and kept painting till she was 84.

Rachel Ruysch Portrait by Godfried Schalcken.  Here is her extended biography.