Celtic Inspired Art Card

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img_5859-1My Celtic inspired Illusion-Fusion ‘Horses, Hares & Swans’ art card is now available at Etsy.  I am still in such admiration for Iron Age Celtic artwork. It combines shape-shifting illusions with geometrical and decorative designs in a way that dazzles me. You see circles and rotating designs in which faces appear and disappear; in which animal forms materialize and disappear again. As if the viewer goes through a shamanistic consciousness changing experience.  The questions and challenges surrounding Celtic art and the fun of experimenting with blending animals, shapes, and forms keeps me busy.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

At Etsy

at Instagram

at Amazon.co.uk

Sashiko, a Creative World

What have I learned so far about Sashiko? A lot! I should preform 10x better by stepping up in neatness, using better colours, and that the backside of the fabric shouldn’t look like a migraine. I can also speed up by using a longer needle. I wish that I could buy Kazu thread but I can’t read Japanese, so I can only buy Sashiko yarn via the English version of Amazon.co.jp. Last, by posting about Sashiko, I gained some very inspiring contacts, like Watts Sashiko who has ventured into the world of Sashiko much deeper. My artist friend Sybille Tezzele Kramer spontaneously invented Sashiko. You should see her process. And Megan Williams, who makes Sashiko a creative meditation in which she remembers her beloved father. Sashiko is a world that bubbles with creativity.

Sashiko (刺し子, literally “little stabs” or “little pierce”) is a form of decorative reinforcement stitching (or functional embroidery) from Japan that started out of practical need during the Edo era (1615-1868). Traditionally used to reinforce points of wear or to repair worn places or tears with patches, making the darned piece ultimately stronger and warmer,this running stitch technique is often used for purely decorative purposes in quilting and embroidery. The white cotton thread on the traditional indigo blue cloth (said to recall snow falling around old farmhouses) gives sashiko its distinctive appearance, though decorative items sometimes use red thread.

The indigo blue fabric, beautiful pastel coloured thread, and traditional Japanese patterns captivate me. I can’t help but finding Sashiko irresistible.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Artist & Author of ‘Birds, Butterflies, Fish & Botany’

At Bol.com

At Etsy

At Amazon.co.uk

At Amazon.com

(Prices vary like the Dutch weather; at the moment the price at Etsy is the best).