An Original Fibonacci Wave Mandarin Duck Drawing to Celebrate Love Wedding Friendship Engagement

Mandarin Ducks Bobbing on Hokusai’s Wave

STORY
Says the male outstanding colourful Mandarin drake to his lovely wife; ‘I love you profoundly; I will stay with you till the end of my days. I don’t know where I end and you begin’. Says the sweet female duck to her handsome drake; ‘Such is our lifelong bond; the high waves of life can’t drift us apart. Together we swim, spatter and stay close to each other to confirm our bond that will last a lifetime’.

OBSERVATION
Is there something more beautiful than seeing a closely bonded couple, in which the male and female are equal in rights, expression, and status. Their love doesn’t need dominance, it isn’t a power-game. They have moved beyond that, to a realm that we call love.

ARTIST STATEMENT
I have drawn, painted, and sold many Mandarin Duck couples and it brings me great pleasure that in parts of the world, where I do not live or travel, my mandarin duck drawings decorate walls of living, study or sleeping rooms. Mandarin Ducks symbolize love and loyalty, and friendship. This drawing has a luxurious, golden border. It needs a lovely square frame.

 

FENG SHUI
In Asia and in Feng Shui it is said that having Mandarin Ducks in your home (painting or picture) attracts love and loyalty. And why not? When people enter the room, they notice this picture of love and loyalty and that is subtly stored in their minds and hearts. They don’t see a drawing or print with one object, but with two birds that love each other. It sets the mindset or mood for a start of a deep friendship or love. Having a mandarin print in your home is suppose to attract love. Maybe it isn’t a myth at all. In traditional Asian culture, mandarin ducks are believed to be lifelong couples, unlike other species of ducks. Hence they are regarded as a symbol of love, affection and fidelity.

FIBONACCI SEQUENCE
I have drawn mandarin ducks in full colour and as albino and leucistic couples. I have drawn them against a minimalist white background, suggesting a pond, or suggesting reeds. And I was about to set out to add a new couple to my portfolio when I noticed the Fibonacci Sequence in one of my old sketches. It made my heart miss a beat because it brought a flood of inspiration. I immediately set out to make a circular composition, adding two ducks shaped as in the well-know Fibonacci fashion. And after having done that successfully, I couldn’t stop and added parts of The Great Wave off Kanagawa by the Japanese artist Hokusai next to the mandarin ducks. Now I had four Fibonacci elements, as I recognized the Fibonacci sequence in Hokusai’s wave too.

MANDARIN DUCKS
These mandarin duck couple, deeply in love with each other, are bathing in wild waters. In fact, they are so deeply bonded, they have no idea where they individually begin or end. They have become one in emotion and routine. They are one with the waters they live in too. The beautiful Hokusai wave, which could be interpreted as the pleasant and unpleasant high waves life throws at every couple, can’t separate them. They will stay together during their whole life; in high tide and low tide, in calm and difficult times, through day and night, till the end.

COPYRIGHT & ORDERING
This drawing/design is copyrighted. I offer this original drawing as a commission. This means that your drawing is hand-drawn, slightly different not in shape or style but perhaps a bit different in colour, as it will be a hand-drawn copy of the first drawing. Original drawings should be ordered via Etsy and will have a waiting list as I draw them mindfully.

YIN YANG SYMBOL
Please, notice the Mandarin ducks eyes holding a Yin-Yang symbol. I can do your drawing without this symbol hidden in their cute eyes.

At Etsy

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

@mindfuldrawing on Instagram

Inquiries:

The Woman or Mother of Willendorf

The Venus of Willendorf was created circa 28.000-25.000 BCE, in Lower Austria. I have drawn it from 3 sides. It is an 11.1-centimetre-tall (4.4 in) and I made sure that the Venus of my drawing is exactly 11.1 centimetres tall. What do you see? You see a faceless woman with large breasts, big hips, missing feet, and two tiny arms resting on the Venus’s breasts. Such unevenly distributed body fat is rare unless a disease is featured. But even if a diseased woman is shown, we can not function without a face and it is much better to have feet. This selective and exaggerated expression of features has lead to the speculation that this figurine is expressing an idea and not a person (selfies become fashionable much later). Is the Venus expressing fertility? It is hard to dismiss this assumption. Upon seeing this cute but impressive female figurine, my first reaction is ‘This woman can feed many babies’. Like my grandmother, who at WWII gave breastfeeding to her own baby and to three babies born to mothers who suffered under the food-shortages or war trauma. Having said this, a big breast-size doesn’t guarantee breastfeeding. Nursing a baby sufficiently is about milk-glands, not about fat. Still, the Venus of Willendorf has two skinny arms positioned on her large breasts. One could say, proudly resting on her breasts, as if to show that her breasts are her biggest treasure. This Venus is, in our eyes, related to fertility and not to sexiness, so many refer to this figurine as ‘The Woman of Willendorf’. Christopher Witcombe criticizes: “The ironic identification of these figurines as ‘Venus’ pleasantly satisfied certain assumptions at the time about the primitive, about women, and about taste”. I agree despite the possibilities that how a good looking woman looked like could have been differently defined 30.000 years ago, if such definition or feeling was lingering in the mind of prehistoric people at all. Certainly maximising the survival of babies was hugely important and with that in mind, the Venus of Willendorf would indeed be better named as the Woman or even Mother of Willendorf.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

 

 

My original drawing and one art print is available at my Etsy and I like to point out that Potted History, at www.pottedhistory.co.uk/ has made some lovely Venus of Willendorf replicas. 

@mindfuldrawing on Instagram

Art Print at Etsy

Original Drawing at Etsy

Shapeshifting, Valentine’s Day & Animal Drawing

Celtic Horses by Paula Kuitenbrouwer
Copyright Paula Kuitenbrouwer ‘Celtic Horses with Swans and Hares’.

(Nederlandse tekst onderaan)

There is a level of subtly in expressing shape-shifting in Celtic art that continues to fascinate me. We see the best shape-shifting Celtic art expressed in metal artwork. How much shape-shifting was expressed by Celtic shamans, artists and craftsman (probably brought together in one person) in wood and stone, we will never know as that is lost forever.

We often see faces in old trees and we see faces in, for instance, Avebury‘s megaliths. In their art, Celtic artists, challenge us to a much higher level of perception. What do we see? Wheels? Faces? Human or animal faces? Big eyes or heads of birds? Things seem pop up, in our consciousness, and disappear again, much like the Rabbit/Duck and Old Woman/Young Lady drawings that psychologist use to show how one can change his/her perception.

The question why Celtic art expressed shape-shifting fascinates me too. Bronze age Celtic craftsmen lived in a world full of spirits; sacred landscapes, monuments, and perhaps even every day tools. Ancestral and animal spirits dwelled everywhere. We have great difficulty understanding their world because we have dismissed spirits. Perhaps shape-shifting art was educational and instrumental to learn to perceive another realms? Or to express that we can see different realms simultaneously?

How many animals do you perceive in my drawing? There are six. I could easily push this drawing a bit further, but I like to use it as a Valentine gift for my husband. The banner will get the text ‘Vinculum Amoris’, the Bond of Love. I will print a few art cards with luxurious full colour inlays: with and without the text. Perhaps you like this art card but with your own text in the banner.

Don’t forget Valentine’s Day! Just spread a bit of love. It doesn’t has to be romantic love. Friendship is equally important. I suggest Mandarin Ducks for romantic love because these ducks symbolize love, and Celtic cards for friends.

Paula

Mandarin Ducks Cards

Mandarin Duck Cards by Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Mandarin Duck Embroidery

img_5846

Blue Celtic Art Card with Boars

img_5854

Celtic Art Card with Stag

img_4713

Celtic Art Card with Vinculum Amoris in the Banner   &

celtichorses empty banner hare swan

Celtic Art Card with an empty banner for you to fill in

In Dutch:

Deze kaart is door Paula Kuitenbrouwer gemaakt, geïnspireerd door het volgen van een cursus aan Oxford Universiteit over Keltische kunst. In Keltische kunst veranderen dieren vaak qua vorm; dieren worden mensen, mensen worden dieren, vogels worden zoogdieren en omgekeerd. Zo zie je heel veel in één plaatje. Paula vond dat zeer inspirerend en heeft 6 dieren in haar tekening samengebracht. Iedereen ziet eerst de paarden. Maar daarna zien sommigen eerst de zwanen en anderen eerst de hazen. Zo zie je dat je van perspectief, van perceptie kunt veranderen zoals psychologen dat laten zien aan de hand van de welbekende Eend/Haas en Jonge Vrouw/Oude Vrouw tekening.
Deze kaart komt met een kleurrijke inleg waarop een tekst of brief geschreven kan worden. Deze kaart heeft een lege banner waarin u een naam of korte tekst kunt schrijven zoals ‘Liefde’ of ‘Beterschap’. Uitstekend geschikt cadeau voor paarden, dieren of Keltische kunst liefhebbers. Komt verpakt in plastic met een naamkaartje en een sluitzegel.
Paula Kuitenbrouwer is eigenaar van http://www.mindfuldrawing.com en is te vinden op Instagram als @mindfuldrawing. Ze leeft met haar man en dochter in Nederland.

Crane Birds Work in Progress

Carefully cutting away the transfer fabric which held the original drawing of the crane birds. Next, I will be working on the Dutch landscape, which will have a low horizon. This will be a gift for my bird loving father, who had the luck of seeing a large group of crane birds flying over. An increasing number of crane birds are nesting in the Netherlands, which is great.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Artist & Author

@mindfuldrawing at Instagram

 

Embroidery as Art

What makes embroidery art? What is required for embroidery to become a masterpiece? I have read a few books on embroidery but I haven’t come across a reflection on this question. As I am rather new to embroidery, I can only use my fine art (painting) knowledge.


A work of fine art is mostly appreciated for technical and artistic exquisite execution (skill and artistic talent). Having said this, there are many works of art that are regarderd masterpieces because of social, political or purely creative qualities.

For a beautiful piece of embroidery some criteria are similar to painting; technical skill, colour-choice, composition, originality of concept/theme, and quality of materials. Don’t underestimate originality; it is enjoyable and valued to see artisans using their your own source of inspiration. Their artwork reflects their life and their conflict or love for their life living in a certain place and time. Such inspiration creates a unique and uncompromising style or signature.

Blue Tufted Ducks by Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Returning to the question ‘What makes embroidery art?’ Embroidery demands an equal amount of skill as painting, drawing, woodwork, and ceramics. For all artwork counts that more skill leads to increased quality and value.

‘Blue Ducks’ & ‘Green Ducks’ in the series of Tufted Ducks by Paula Kuitenbrouwer.

I used gold thread & various blues plus freehand-stitch, pekinese-stitch, french-knots & openchain-stitch. I always use my own designs, based on my coloured pencil drawings or oil paintings. Occasionally I use my sketches for making lino-prints too.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Artist, Author & Expat

‘Birds, Butterflies, Fish & Botany’

@mindfuldrawing on Instagram

Woolgathering

I learned a new word: woolgathering. I like new words and I especially like woolgathering because I like textile craft, cotton, wool and gathering supplies. But that is not what woolgathering means, however woolgathering was original used for gathering the leftover pieces of wool after sheep shearing. Woolgathering now means to indulgence in aimless thought or dreamy imagining, in short, day-dreaming. Can artists day-dream? Or do they rush to their sketch-books, canvasses, notebooks in a bee-line to pen down their inspirational ideas?

William Wordsworth wrote in his Daffodils poem that when he is ‘In vacant or in pensive mood, They (daffodils) flash upon that inward eye’. Is that vacant and pensive mood daydreaming or woolgathering? I don’t think so.

Poetically reflecting is closely related but it seems different from woolgathering to me. Woolgathering is without focus; poetic reflection demands concentration. However, the effect is the same; inspiration floods the mind. Off I go, rushing to my desk where my sketchbooks, notebooks and soap-stones are waiting for me. I leave the woolgathering to others.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Artist, Author & Expat

@mindfuldrawing on Instagram

Feng Shui Elements artistically interpreted by Paula Kuitenbrouwer

This are Feng Shui’s 5 Elements: Water, Earth, Metal, Wood and Fire, drawn as artistic interpretations by Paula Kuitenbrouwer, Dutch nature artist living in Ireland.

These circular compositions, that are printed on high quality art paper with light-fast pigments, show exquisite details and skill. They can be used at home, for Feng Shui workshops and in office rooms. They are engaging, invite exploring of your ideas about what are elements, what do they represent and which role do they play in your life. Are they in balance in your life, in your home, in your work-place?
As from ancient times philosophers discussed the elements of life. What were the building blocks of life? Many manuscripts were written on the elements of life, some adding air, aether and void as an element too.

Today the best known elements are for school students the periodic table and to Feng Shui specialist the 5 ancient Taoist elements.

Water: Paula has drawn a cut through that shows water in a pond. As water is so minimal visible, it is the lotus growing in the lotus pond that shows indirectly a body of water.

Wood: Again Paula uses a cut through, showing the growth rings, representing wood. Counting the growth rings of a tree is a way to tell how old a tree is.

Earth: Next to a cut-through, that shows soil and dirt layers, Paula shows how we use dirt since prehistoric times, to make ceramics and to built stone walls. This is a solid drawing representing the grounding and soil character of earth.

Fire: There are flames in this drawing, in one of its outer rings, but Paula prefers the fiery petals of red tulips to present the fire element, its passion and its dominant red colour.

Metal: Paula shows a beautiful silver teapot with white-washed and golden decorated tea cups. This drawing is done with Derwent metallic coloured pencils using Bronze, Gold and Silver. It works: the print shows a metallic shine that communicated the metallic element. Frame this drawing with a metallic frame and its crisp white background works effectively.

For a healthy, harmonious, and beautiful atmosphere in your home.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer is owner of http://www.mindfuldrawing.com and can be found on Instagram as @mindfuldrawing.

EX LIBRIS with Head of a Young Apostle by Raphael

I promised more Ex Libris designs so, voilà, here is my Ex Libris with my study of Raphael’s Head of a Young Apostle. More about this drawing by Raphael and its extraordinary value you will find here (click here). I fell so deeply in love with Raphael’s Head of a Young Apostle, I sat down to draw a study of it. It might sound strange, but I believe that artists often paint or draw themselves, even when they make portraits of others. One can not exapostel12escape ones own feelings, observation, perspective and projections, in that sense artists draw ourselves hidden in their drawings or paintings.

When it comes to drawing a portrait, like a ‘Young Apostle’ without having a life model in front of me, my subconsciousness  projects itself and draws itself to a certain extent. To a certain extent, because I am not a young apostle and I am a woman. Still, my study gives away a lot about myself; about loving the theme of a  young apostle, loving a Renaissance type of drawing, loving Raphael’s artwork, and altering Raphael’s model to a person that is taller and skinnier than his chosen model. exapostel13

I decided the use the study as a theme for my Ex Libris design which prompted me to select a Renaissance letter-font. Again, I grew so happy studying Renaissance manuscripts, letter fonts, and signatures. How pretty they are; how profoundly artistic and special.

Many years ago my family visited a Raphael exhibition and I had the chance to study a drawing by Raphael very close up. Not that I was alone, far form that! You had to buy tickets with a time-slot. But somehow, I was lucky and I could press my nose almost against the protective glass and have a very close look at a small piece of sketching paper with some Madonna sketches by Raphael. The paper had been carefully repaired in many places. I could see how conservators or restorers had added paper to the original paper, as you notice new fabric is being added to support fabric thatexapostel14 is falling apart. The whole document; the work of Raphael as well as the work by conservators made time stand still for me. I was enchanted. Mesmerized! While others were opening their art appreciative hearts to larger canvasses with bold colours and exquisite Madonnas and baby Jesus, I was hypnotized by this small piece of restored paper with unbelievable skillful sketches by Raphael. One knows when one meets a master.

Those who buy my booklet, will get one for free. Please mail me so that I can send my Renaissance Ex Libris to you by regular post: shipped from the Netherlands.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer at Etsy

Artist, Author & Expat

Instagram @mindfuldrawing

Save