Postage Stamp Design

(Study sheets on which I test Derwent Graphitint)

Enjoy my study sheets and my final drawing of a postage stamp with a composition of two swans (male & female), a lotus plant, and a dragonfly. I used Derwent Graphitints and a Winson & Newton fine-liner, both excellent products. Graphitint behaves so wonderfully and Winson & Newton fine-liners are a dream for drawing tiny swan feathers.

I am accepting commissions for personalized postage stamp designs.

At Etsy

Paula’s Etsy shop

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Art Nouveau Ex Libris Commission

 

Copyright Paula Kuitenbrouwer

 

With much joy I designed this Ex Libris or book-plate in Art Nouveau or Jugendstil style.  I consulted art books that I had almost forgotten about and I enjoyed updating my knowledge of the Art Nouveau movement. I decided to draw a tree, a window for (your) name, hills, a stream, and of course some embellishments.

 

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Owner of http://www.mindfuldrawing.com

At Etsy

I accept Ex Libris, heraldry, and post-stamp commissions.

Jugenstil Art Nouveau Ex Libris (Work in Progress)

Designing Celtic interlace is fun; making an Art Nouveau (Jugendstil) corner design is as exciting.

Art Nouveau added beauty to our world between 1890 and 1910. Both Jugendstil and Celtic patterns were inspired by natural forms and structures, particularly the curved and intertwined lines of plants and flowers. What Celtic design has more than Jugendstil are Celtic animals like boars, horses, and birds. Jugendstil used more shell shapes. What I love about both is that one has to make an effort to understand the designs. Although they look instantly beautiful and fascinating, one can spend extra time to ‘unlock’ what can be seen in these natural patterns. Did I just see an owl? Or was it a horse-head? Flowers seem to come and go, an organic flow of natural forms that tell us a story. Perhaps a story of a woodland walk, or of a floral bouquet one gives to a friend. Or perhaps we are looking at a story of a beach walk, collecting shells. Life is like that and our dream-world is like that: we are witnessing a flow of events.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

At Etsy

at Bloglovin

Commission Heraldry

It is such fun to work on this commission that shows a unicorn. How do unicorns look like? I did some research. Apparently unicorns have sheep-like faces and the tails of a wild boar, a lion, or a donkey. Their bodies sometimes look like sheep, dogs, horses, or deer. Baby unicorns look lovely. Their horns are often tall, sometimes short but most of the time twisted. Unicorns get killed frequently, sometimes snuggle up to Medieval ladies, or get used as horses or donkeys. They fight too, especially with lions. They often have horse or deer hooves sometimes lion paws. They are elegant or not; victim or aggressor. Thus drawing a unicorn feels like drawing a composite mammal; I even had to look up the spiral tusk of a narwhal, our sea-unicorns. The preferences were; snow-leopard print on the back, a beard and curly hair near its hooves.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

On Etsy.

Heraldry Commission

Graphitint; a new adventure

I went to our local art-shop and asked what new products have been introduced in the graphite section. The sales person advised me to have a look at Derwent’s Graphitint. He assisted me with trying out the pencils on different art papers. I was sold on the spot. I should keep a better eye on new tools. Too often I see horribly bright and plastic stuff being introduced at the checkout of artist shops. Thus I have adopted a strict policy of ignoring promotions. But these Graphitints were almost hidden, very decently stored between loads of other pencils. The modest colours, timid character, and humble attitude of these pencils charms me! This is not a review and I am not affiliated to Derwent; I am upgrading my knowledge and tools, which is a good and nice thing to do. May I ask my fellow artists what are your most recent added tools and what new products do you happily work with? What are your favourite tools anyway? Currently my favourites are Derwent H pencils; perhaps Graphitint will join the list.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

Artist at mindfuldrawing.com #paulakuitenbrouwer #graphite #graphitedrawing #graphiteart #tealduck #wintertaling #artist #dutchartist #derwent #derwentpencils #graphitint #graphitintpencils #commissionsopen #commission #bestarttools #bestpencils #tekenen #drawing #etsyseller #artistsoninstagram #artista #artiste #artistico #artistoninstagram #colouredpencils #coloredpencils #artistique #artistlife #artistproblems

Graphite Drawing: In Praise of Plants

This is a large graphite drawing (about the size of A3) beautifully and softly rendered, titled ‘Praising Plants’. I have set up this drawing as a way to show gratitude towards (house) plants. They provide us with oxygen, hence the text ‘Thank Your for your O2,’ a word rhyme that names oxygen by its element. Instead of drawing plants in pots, I have used a frame decorated with Ginkgo leaves. These leaves are found near Ginkgo trees, often in growing in botanical gardens or in Asian cities. Inside the border, I have added two plant motifs, Acanthus and Pimpernel Bay-leaf Manilla, inspired by William Morris, a British textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement. The two other plant motifs are designed by me; Bamboo and Lotus flower.

One should see this drawing as a garden, as a local botanical garden in which one can deeply relax and become thankful for what plants do for us. Not only do they provide us with oxygen, but also with soul nourishment and above all, with beauty. Frame this drawing and feel inspired by what plants mean for us and how they can enchant us with their intricate patterns. I sell this original and there are no copies available. This makes this drawing unique gift.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

at Etsy

This drawing at Etsy.

An Original Fibonacci Wave Mandarin Duck Drawing to Celebrate Love Wedding Friendship Engagement

Mandarin Ducks Bobbing on Hokusai’s Wave

STORY
Says the male outstanding colourful Mandarin drake to his lovely wife; ‘I love you profoundly; I will stay with you till the end of my days. I don’t know where I end and you begin’. Says the sweet female duck to her handsome drake; ‘Such is our lifelong bond; the high waves of life can’t drift us apart. Together we swim, spatter and stay close to each other to confirm our bond that will last a lifetime’.

OBSERVATION
Is there something more beautiful than seeing a closely bonded couple, in which the male and female are equal in rights, expression, and status. Their love doesn’t need dominance, it isn’t a power-game. They have moved beyond that, to a realm that we call love.

ARTIST STATEMENT
I have drawn, painted, and sold many Mandarin Duck couples and it brings me great pleasure that in parts of the world, where I do not live or travel, my mandarin duck drawings decorate walls of living, study or sleeping rooms. Mandarin Ducks symbolize love and loyalty, and friendship. This drawing has a luxurious, golden border. It needs a lovely square frame.

 

FENG SHUI
In Asia and in Feng Shui it is said that having Mandarin Ducks in your home (painting or picture) attracts love and loyalty. And why not? When people enter the room, they notice this picture of love and loyalty and that is subtly stored in their minds and hearts. They don’t see a drawing or print with one object, but with two birds that love each other. It sets the mindset or mood for a start of a deep friendship or love. Having a mandarin print in your home is suppose to attract love. Maybe it isn’t a myth at all. In traditional Asian culture, mandarin ducks are believed to be lifelong couples, unlike other species of ducks. Hence they are regarded as a symbol of love, affection and fidelity.

FIBONACCI SEQUENCE
I have drawn mandarin ducks in full colour and as albino and leucistic couples. I have drawn them against a minimalist white background, suggesting a pond, or suggesting reeds. And I was about to set out to add a new couple to my portfolio when I noticed the Fibonacci Sequence in one of my old sketches. It made my heart miss a beat because it brought a flood of inspiration. I immediately set out to make a circular composition, adding two ducks shaped as in the well-know Fibonacci fashion. And after having done that successfully, I couldn’t stop and added parts of The Great Wave off Kanagawa by the Japanese artist Hokusai next to the mandarin ducks. Now I had four Fibonacci elements, as I recognized the Fibonacci sequence in Hokusai’s wave too.

MANDARIN DUCKS
These mandarin duck couple, deeply in love with each other, are bathing in wild waters. In fact, they are so deeply bonded, they have no idea where they individually begin or end. They have become one in emotion and routine. They are one with the waters they live in too. The beautiful Hokusai wave, which could be interpreted as the pleasant and unpleasant high waves life throws at every couple, can’t separate them. They will stay together during their whole life; in high tide and low tide, in calm and difficult times, through day and night, till the end.

COPYRIGHT & ORDERING
This drawing/design is copyrighted. I offer this original drawing as a commission. This means that your drawing is hand-drawn, slightly different not in shape or style but perhaps a bit different in colour, as it will be a hand-drawn copy of the first drawing. Original drawings should be ordered via Etsy and will have a waiting list as I draw them mindfully.

YIN YANG SYMBOL
Please, notice the Mandarin ducks eyes holding a Yin-Yang symbol. I can do your drawing without this symbol hidden in their cute eyes.

At Etsy

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

@mindfuldrawing on Instagram

Inquiries:

The Woman or Mother of Willendorf

The Venus of Willendorf was created circa 28.000-25.000 BCE, in Lower Austria. I have drawn it from 3 sides. It is an 11.1-centimetre-tall (4.4 in) and I made sure that the Venus of my drawing is exactly 11.1 centimetres tall. What do you see? You see a faceless woman with large breasts, big hips, missing feet, and two tiny arms resting on the Venus’s breasts. Such unevenly distributed body fat is rare unless a disease is featured. But even if a diseased woman is shown, we can not function without a face and it is much better to have feet. This selective and exaggerated expression of features has lead to the speculation that this figurine is expressing an idea and not a person (selfies become fashionable much later). Is the Venus expressing fertility? It is hard to dismiss this assumption. Upon seeing this cute but impressive female figurine, my first reaction is ‘This woman can feed many babies’. Like my grandmother, who at WWII gave breastfeeding to her own baby and to three babies born to mothers who suffered under the food-shortages or war trauma. Having said this, a big breast-size doesn’t guarantee breastfeeding. Nursing a baby sufficiently is about milk-glands, not about fat. Still, the Venus of Willendorf has two skinny arms positioned on her large breasts. One could say, proudly resting on her breasts, as if to show that her breasts are her biggest treasure. This Venus is, in our eyes, related to fertility and not to sexiness, so many refer to this figurine as ‘The Woman of Willendorf’. Christopher Witcombe criticizes: “The ironic identification of these figurines as ‘Venus’ pleasantly satisfied certain assumptions at the time about the primitive, about women, and about taste”. I agree despite the possibilities that how a good looking woman looked like could have been differently defined 30.000 years ago, if such definition or feeling was lingering in the mind of prehistoric people at all. Certainly maximising the survival of babies was hugely important and with that in mind, the Venus of Willendorf would indeed be better named as the Woman or even Mother of Willendorf.

Paula Kuitenbrouwer

 

 

My original drawing and one art print is available at my Etsy and I like to point out that Potted History, at www.pottedhistory.co.uk/ has made some lovely Venus of Willendorf replicas. 

@mindfuldrawing on Instagram

Art Print at Etsy

Original Drawing at Etsy

Going beyond predictable performance practice

Decades back, I read a remark that most people dare not to accept their greatness. Today such quote would provoke criticism because currently there are too many inflated egos grabbing power and money. If it wasn’t for the middle class, the mediocracy, the sane and well balanced mass, and the majority of people who ‘Stay Calm & Carry On’ that we are still sailing through epic well-fare inequalities without revolt. So, bravo for this ‘middle’ group. However and despite of living through this inflated ego era, the quote recently inspired me to run an experiment as I applied in solely on art practice.

I know what I am good at in my studio. But what would happen if I would go beyond choosing the comfortable or predictable performance practice? What if I, after feeling inspired, would dismiss my first impulse to work, hit a pause button, and dwell a day or two on the question of how can I work with this idea on a next ‘greater’ level? And with the next level I mean higher quality of tools, larger in size, and/or more daring in execution (the latest prerequisite/demand being the most difficult to imagine). Well, it has been fruitful to run such experiment. It has resulted in opening my oil paint box that had been closed for over 2 years. The smell of the tubes and the well-known names of the classical palette…mmmm! And touching a large white canvas, already seeing with my mind’s eye a primarily lay-out (the size of the canvas scares me). The ‘next level’ might still not be something great, instead it probably is still very modest, but the process of lifting up yourself to a higher and more daring level has certainly given much joy and has nourished my creativity.

Paula

 

My booklet at Amazon.com & Amazon.co.uk and, of course, Etsy. I can not add a lovely art card to your order when you order at Amazon, however I will add on one should you order at Etsy.

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